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  • Writer's pictureKarryanne Wong

Law firms, LinkedIn and Lunches: An Unforgettable Experience at Ravenscroft & Schmierer


Over the summer, I had the opportunity to intern at Ravenscroft & Schmierer for three weeks. Read my article and listen to my podcast below to learn more about my time at the firm! And stay tuned for another article, written together with Anna Lau, to be published soon on the use of self-identification orders in cybercrime cases. I am grateful for the support and guidance I have received from everyone at Ravenscroft & Schmierer, and I look forward to applying the skills and knowledge I have gained in my future endeavors.


Author: Karryanne Wong, Intern

At the office with my fellow interns.


What happens when fish goes bad on a container ship?


"Hi, Karryanne. Could you help me think of some causes of action with Mark? Additionally, do you have any suggestions for other costs we could claim for the ship's delay and our client's losses?" Kelly, one of the firm's trainee solicitors, asked as she sent me a folder containing documents, email copies, and even photos of the container ship in question.


Though I understood each of her words, something didn't sound right. What exactly is a ‘cause of action’? This was a term I had never heard of at university, even after desperately cramming for my summer exams.


After conducting some quick research, I realised that the concept of a ‘cause of action’ wasn't as complicated as I had initially thought. Simply put, it is a legal term that refers to the legal basis for a claim as the reason or grounds for a lawsuit. For example, if an employee in Hong Kong was unable to work due to injury, they might be eligible to claim medical expenses and compensation for their pain and suffering in addition to lost wages lost during their absence.



The backstage work of court


As my internship at Ravenscroft & Schmierer progressed, I began to notice the gap between what I learned at university and the practical application of the law. I filed bundles, drafted articles on new forms of injunctions, and attended court proceedings.


Organising bundles with my fellow interns.


One of the many highlights during this internship was a court hearing I attended with Anna and Erica regarding an internet fraud case, although I am aware that, if I become a solicitor, I would rarely be in court.


Law & Technology: A two-minute court hearing & A written article


Rice-roll in one hand and lemon tea in the other, I walked up to court excited yet nervous. What if I didn't understand any of the legal jargon that the judge and barrister would throw around? My concerns, however, were completely thrown away when the court hearing commenced.


'Sure, then let's continue with the injunction.' 'Next court!'


The court hearing was over just like that. One question from the judge about the details of the injunction and leave was granted. No other questions were asked. We walked out of the courtroom, ready to return to the office.


While I was baffled at how little was asked, I understood that this was the result of all the hard work we spent at the office; putting together, filing, tabbing, and delivering bundles to all parties involved, which ultimately ensured our smooth time in court.


Following my time at court, I was tasked to write an article about the use of self-identification orders in cybercrime cases. I was able to conduct research independently, examining past cases from England and Malaysia in my analysis of the orders. In writing my article, I understood that this was an integral part of what solicitors do. The legal system is in constant change, and it is our responsibility to keep up with such changes. My article on cybercrime will be published soon, so make sure to look out for it!


The court was over just like that. One question from the judge about the details of the injunction and leave was granted. No other questions were asked. We walked out of the courtroom, ready to return to the office. While I was baffled at how little was asked, I understood that this was the result of all the hard work we've put in at the office; putting together, filing, tabbing, and delivering bundles to all parties involved, which ultimately ensured our smooth time in court.


Dim sum with my colleagues: A Friday special!


My #1 tip: Have a strong LinkedIn profile


As I prepare to wrap up my internship, I would like to share a few tips that have helped me succeed during my time here. Firstly, a complete LinkedIn profile, with a professional headshot photo, is crucial, as the platform is a powerful tool for building connections and advancing your career.


Second, owning up to mistakes is essential in the legal field, as it demonstrates integrity and accountability. And finally, don't be afraid to ask for work, help, or even just a friendly chat. Building relationships and networking with colleagues can be immensely beneficial, both personally and professionally.



Listen to my podcast about technology in the legal industry here!


If you want to learn more about the use of technology in court regarding cybercrime and its impact, listen to the above podcast I recorded during my internship with Hayley.


 

Karryanne is a rising penultimate-year student at LSE studying a BA in Anthropology and Law. She completed her internship at Ravenscroft and Schmierer in July 2023.

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